“All Right There, Soldier?” by Vincent O’Sullivan

Last April, on the invitation of Dr. Marco Sonzogni, Director of the New Zealand Centre for Literary Translation http://www.victoria.ac.nz/slc/nzclt, and of Dr. Sydney Shep, Director of Wai-te-Ata Press http://www.victoria.ac.nz/wtapress/, I took part in a month-long “cartoonist’s residency” at the University of Victoria of Wellington, in New Zealand. As detailed in a previous post, my role in the residency involves the creation of various visual responses to a number of WWI-related texts. On the request of the Canadian High Commission to New Zealand, which sponsored my visit, I created a comics adaptation of Canada’s most iconic poem of the First World War, John McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields.” I also created this adaptation of a poem by Vincent O’ Sullivan, New Zealand’s current Poet Laureate. “All Right There, Soldier?” was written especially for this project, and can be read in part as a response to McCrae’s poem.

Hokitika is a town on the West coast of New Zealand’s South Island, and Newtown and Aro Street are traditionally working-class areas of Wellington.

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This entry was posted in comics, marco sonzogni, new zealand centre for literary translation, Poetry, Poetry Comics, victoria university wellington and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to “All Right There, Soldier?” by Vincent O’Sullivan

  1. Pingback: “In Flanders Field” by John McCrae | julian peters comics

  2. alice says:

    Il y a donc un cimetière où s’alignent les tombes identiques de soldats morts pour Reine, Roi ou Patrie dans toutes les villes de quelque importance? C’est ce que tu illustres, ici.
    Dans un entredeux j’ai vu les rangs de tombes américaines rejoindre les aligements de Carnac.
    Les menhirs de Carnac étaient à droite; les alignements et les rangs de tombes semblaient se tourner les uns vers les autres et se rejoindre où ils s’arrêtaient.
    Juste pour te dire.

    Like

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